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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)
is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc members from virginia. >> most of these challenges were received in a timely fashion, and reviewed by the credentials committee co-chair. after reviewing each of these challenges, the co-chairs determined that neither of the challenges have merit and the members under challenge were to comment to be properly elected members of the democratic national committee. >> with that, we now recommend to this body the adoption
-- she pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton'
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
, democratic senator chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." welcome to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially under way, this debate is well under way. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish with comprehensive gun control. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that, of course, lapsed in 2004, and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne la pierre of the nra on this program very hard when this initially came up, i challenge you as well with the question of is this really going to make a difference? and rich lowry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so
banks are putting in. we're through the u.s. elections, ahead of the debt ceiling debate. in some sense there isn't an immediate crisis. it's a question now whether ceos can get through the real economic fundamentals. in some ways we're betwiked and between, kelly. >> i like the scarf, ross. >> yeah. that's the point. look, there's plenty to come on our coverage today. let me recap some of the people we're going to be talking to. john lipinski, formerly of the imf. and hamish tyrwhitt, construction group out of australia. we saw rates dip a little today. suggesting there's room to cut rates. and the executive dean of peking university. we're more relaxed about china, more relaxed than three or four months ago. we'll get the inside there. all of that is coming up on today's "worldwide exchange." how are the markets looking? >> perfect. we'll check the markets in a second. i want to bring news out of the bank upon spain saying fourth quarter gdp was down 1.not -- 1.7% drop, it was .6 drop. pretty large. and 2012 gdp down 1.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news f
of american freedom and democracy. for the 57th time in our history, a president freely elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our c
election, for example, i think the most racially divisive comment of the entire election was joe biden's comment where he said if the republicans win, they are, quote, going to put y'all back in chains. that made my heart weep to see a sitting vice president playing to racial fears and playing on those issues. i think that's unfortunate. i don't think it has any place in politics. >> chuck hagel, you were very tepid on "meet the press" a couple of weeks ago. >> i was. >> now you've met with him, you're more comfortable, you'll support him? >> i am. >> what changed? >> i said on your show that i had real concerns. i spent 90 minutes with him. i asked him very specific questions on the things that troubled me. his answers were forth right. and they were answers that alayed my concerns. should we keep every option on the table to prevent a nuclear iran? yes. i went further. i said, do you think we can tolerate a nuclear iran? he said no. and i said to him, well, then, if we had to use military as the only choice, would you? he said yes. second, i asked him hezbollah and hamas, should they
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
the election and i'm going to be aggressive in the second term about pushing my agenda. >> and i think we had a clarifying moment and the president's speech put to rest, put to rest the idea that barack obama is a moderate. barack obama is a liberal. >> i don't think that absolutism, i'm sure the president would say the same, on the part of either party or any politician is helpful in terms of solving problems and obviously, if we're going to move forward we're going to have to find a way to come together to solve these problems. >> now dually reelected, he intends to pursue the course of that liberalism. he's going to pursue it as if he had from the election an enormous mandate. >> when i heard that was a liberal speech, i don't think it was a liberal speech, i think it's a popular speech. >> and the battle lines are clearly drawn and i don't think there's hope of-- barring unforeseen developments, that we'll have the unity that people in washington wished for so long. >> we believe strongly there are areas in common that we can work with the president on to promote the kind of innovation an
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
not been dissolved and the election committee will function in the same way it always has. qadri has remained controversial due to his motives and finances but forced the government to listen to his commands and they criticized the government for allowing thousands in the capitol. but that those in charge should be held accountable. >> all the people who are elected in the parliaments are servants of the public and those who are elected should never forget that they are the servants. >> the government had warned if anything happened to women and children involved in the rally, qadri will be held responsible. tens of thousands supporters were camping out in islamabad. a large number were members of the parent organization but not all of them. >> i wanted to show the world, we the people in islamabad who work here and studying here, he also are supporters of him because he makes a lot of sense. >> qadri seemingly called for change and then a quick change of heart has given way to many conspiracy theories, including some sort of approval by the pakistani establishment. >> people who hav
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
: big election day today. voting is underway in israel for the country's next leader, current prime minister benjamin netanyahu voting today. expected to win re-election but with a smaller majority than in 2009. results are expected in this afternoon and we will have them for you live whether they happen. bill: in our country now the president setting up the next round of big budget battles. mr. obama defending the role of government in reaffirming support for major entitlement programs, the drivers of her debt like medicare, medicaid and social security, leaving many to wonder if any of d.c.'s spending will decrease. in fact democratic senator chuck schumer already suggesting that taxes may need to go up again to pay for all those bills and all that spending. stephen hayes, senior writer, "weekly standard", and fox news contributor has been on this. steve, good morning to you. how are you doing, post inauguration day? >> doing well. bill: give us a sense about what we can expect to happen in your town next. >> well, i think very little. you're looking at a spending, spending trend
it because he doesn't have to worry about getting re-elected. >> well, he wasn't concealing anything. he's a progressive democrat. i loved the speech yesterday because of what he didn't say. he very often goes into this kind of airy dreaming of how we'll just transcend partisanship. well, we won't. politics is partisan. washington is partisan. it was for president clinton who wanted to campaign that he was there, campaigned saying i want to be a uniter, not a divider. our president said, he offered a vision that republicans should sign on to. they used to be tough when i was a kid. now they are just whiny. he reached out to them plenty in his first term and all they did was spit in his eye. >> i think when it comes to comprehensive immigration reform, i think the president can work with senator marco rubio. but what about on climate change? what about same-sex marriage? is there going to be cooperation in those two areas? >> number one, on same-sex marriage, the president hasn't thrown any weight behind legislation or for repealing the legislation that paul's because, bill's boss signed
. the clerk: house resolution 42. resolved, that the following named members be and are hereby elected to the following standing committees -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the reading is suspended. without objection, the resolution is agreed to and the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia rise? the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. >> thank you, madam speaker. i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today it adjourn to meet at 2:00 p.m. on friday, january 25, 2013, and when the house adjourns on that day it adjourn to meet at 1:00 p.m. on tuesday, january 29, 2013. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the chair now announces the speaker's appoint pursuant to sections 5580 and 5581 of the revised statute, 20, u.s.c., and the order of the house of january 3, 2013, of the follow
obama initially sidestepped the issue in 2011 by putting it off until after the election. on tuesday, the state department confirmed the white house would not make a decision in the year's first quarter. there was an announcement of support from nebraska governor dave heineman. in a letter to the white house, he signed off on the section of the proposed keystone route from canada after it was redesigned to avoid a key october. -- aquafor. 350.org does organizing a presidents' day rally against the pipeline in washington, d.c. next month. the supreme court has refused to hear in this group challenge of the epa to set standards for air pollution. the move leaves intact a 2010 regulation limiting regulations of sulfur dioxide. president obama has tacitly endorsed a house republican plan to lift the debt ceiling for the next four months. the measure would lift enforcement of the government's $16.40 trillion borrowing limit until may 18. in a statement, the white house said it would not oppose the temporary move. a house vote is expected today. protests on both sides of the reproductive r
americans who died in algeria. >>> "outfront" next elections in israel today. the voters send benjamin netanyahu a strong message. >>> and [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have the flu... i took theraflu, but i still have this cough. [ male announcer ] truth is theraflu doesn't treat your cough. . enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. [ male announcer ] end your long week... with a weekend getaway. save up to forty percent on all weekend hotel stays. book by january thirty first at hiltonanyweekend.com. >>> we are back with tonight's outer circle, where we reach out to our sources around the world. tonight, we go to israel, where voters turned out in huge numbers today to decide whether coalition led by benjamin netanyahu will continue to lead the country. a right wing coalition. the results were not as clear as expe
americans who died in algeria. >>> "outfront" next -- elections in israel today. the voters send benjamin netanyahu a strong message. like a lot of things, trying to find a better job can be frustrating. so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. aww man. [ male announc ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ looks like you're in a pickle. yeah. can you get me out of it ? just so happens i know a chap... book any flight and hotel together and get access to our free personal concierge service. any need, any question, we're on call 24/7. >>> we are back with tonight's outer circle, where we reach out to
time here in the country as we approached an election. notwithstanding that, the american people are still entitled to be told the truth about this. did you select ambassador rice to deliver the message to the american people? >> i did not, senator. let me take this opportunity to address this. obviously even though i haven't had a chance to testify, i've certainly seen the resulting debate and concerns about this. you're right, it was a terrorist attack. i called it an attack by heavily armed militants -- >> well done. >> and that is clearly what happened. we know that. but second, the harder question is what caused it and that we didn't know. we didn't know who the attackers were and what the motives were. third, as the arb makes clear after the months of research, the picture remains still still somewhat complicated and i say that because in the unclassified arb, it is -- i quote, key questions surrounding the identity and actions and motivations of the perpetrators remain to be determined. i recommend that all members and staff read the classified version of the arb, which go
. >>> israelis are counting the votes in their parliamentary election. prime minister benjamin netanyahu has already claimed victory. but exit polls suggest he'll be governing with a weaker mandate. the polls indicate that a right-wing bloc led by netanyahu's likud party will remain the largest camp in parliament. but it lost ground to an alliance of center-left parties. >> translator: thank you for giving me the chance to lead israel for the third time. our biggest challenge remains preventing iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. >> centrist party yesh atid is likely to become the second largest parliamentary force. the center-left labor party is projected to come third. the ultranationalist habayi habayit hayudi looks to secure its number of seats. the party opposes peace talks with palestinians. centrist parties have performed better than expected. some voters may have been worried by the country's tilt to the right. netanyahu is expected to begin negotiations with other parties to form a coalition. but it won't be easy. the gap between the two blocs will be narrow. >>> japanese research
and government, monica, you can put all your cards on the table for a midterm election, if you take control of the house you have two years of an open playing field. do yo think that is the strategy? >> absolutely. it is all about 2014. remember the president had the run of the field in his first two years before the house flipped to republican control. he misses that. and what he wants for his legacy is, as he said in 2008, the fundamental transformation of the nation. by that he means turning america into a european-style socialist state or social democracy. he had the run of the field for the first two years. he wants his last two years as president to be exactly that. so everything he is doing is geared toward flipping the house of representatives back to democratic control. and if you're the republican party, not just the national party but right on down to the state and local levels, bill, here's what you do. you focus on the house. you focus on individual districts. you focus on how you can retain control of the house and pick up seats. bill: focus on the majority, right? >> focus on
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)

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